Archive for the 'high voltage' Tag

8-stage Cockroft-Walton/Villard cascade multiplier

Something I’ve crafted for the new X-ray experiments: a half wave, eight stage Cockroft Walton multiplier (or a Villard cascade, whichever name you like), submerged in oil, providing a theoretical maximum output voltage in excess of 220 kV with a maximum supply voltage of 10 kV AC, with headroom.… [read more]

3D X-ray setup

A real-time, fluoroscopic X-ray setup of my previous attempts with the beryllium-window tube. However, radiographed objects are now placed on a slow moving turntable motor, thus creating a spectacular 3D effect, captured on camera.… [read more]

4200V high voltage supply “The Killer”

Providing output of a kilowatt long-term and in excess of 4 kVA short-term, undoubtedly it is the most powerful single-phase power supply I’ve made, and the scariest of them all! Whether you want to power up medium size Tesla coils, arc-weld through any sensitive electronic evidence or commit suicide using one of the most horrendous ways, this beast always gets the job done.… [read more]

Fluoroscopy of a hand

This might be the craziest documented experiment/project on my page – a fluoroscopic radiograph of my hand, utilizing my beryllium-windowed vacuum tube setup. For the sake of your own safety and the safety of others, do not attempt to recreate without proper knowledge and protection, as hazards include radiation sickness, increased risk of cancer or amputation of irradiated… [read more]

X-rays with a Beryllium-window tube

While lurking on eBay on a nice spring day of 2012,  I have been lucky to obtain a real gem, for a very cheap price indeed: a special micro-focus X-ray tube, with a Be window on the beam port, mostly for spectral analysis or fluoroscopic scanning purposes, for up to 150 kilovolts with forced oil cooling at high powers; made by a now-defunct American EG&G Astrophysics company… [read more]

Dual ignition coil driver

Apart from flyback transformers or MOTs, automotive ignition coils are also used as high voltage sources by many enthusiasts. Especially those classic cylinder-shaped ones, used in carbureted engines pre-1990, since these were driven directly from the battery (through contact breakers) to generate sparks and a sturdy primary/secondary winding with appropriate insulation… [read more]

X-rays with a dental Chirana

After receiving a donation of two nice X-ray intensifying screens from Mr. Máca, a Czech radiologist (many thanks!) in 2011, it wasn’t long before I got a hand on a real X-ray tube, obtained through barter trade, with some luck, too. Only then were my previous failed X-ray attempts with DY86‘s and 6VS-1‘s marked with success, at least!… [read more]

Small Vacuum tube Tesla coil (VTTC)

To go along with flyback drivers, X-rays and other high voltage stuff, I have decided to build myself a Tesla coil. Because I live in a flat though, there would be no place to accomodate and run monstrous coil designs, not mentioning interference, so that is the reason why I’ve opted for small and sweet portable setups like this one is.… [read more]

X-rays with a 6VS-1 (6ВС-1)

In 2010, me having already exploited the DY86, a Czech experimenter nicknamed “DANYK” came up with an oddball Soviet vacuum stabilisator tetrode “6VS-1”, which produced copious amounts of X-rays in hot-cathode mode. He got pretty good radiographs, nevertheless. So, I have got an inspiration and obtained a few:… [read more]

X-rays with a DY86

The DY86 (DY87, DY802) vacuum rectifier was used in most European black and white tube television sets. In hot-cathode mode, it was capable of rectifying up to 18 kilovolts at 0.5 mA. In cold-cathode mode, however, it withstands 40 kilovolts DC inverse for a short time, while providing some soft X-ray radiation enough to set classic Geiger counters off.… [read more]

Flyback driver #3: ZVS

The ZVS flyback driver, made popular by Vladimiro Mazzilli, is one of the most efficient and powerful flyback drivers used by high voltage hobbyists from all over the world. The main advantages of this driver are simplicity of the circuit itself, very high efficiency and easily obtainable parts. By tuning it properly you are able to get insane power outputs; beefy flyback transformers… [read more]

A Guide to Flyback Transformers

Unless professionally required, a lot of high voltage enthusiasts do not wind their high voltage transformers at home. This task would be nearly impossible to do without proper coil winding, insulation potting and vacuum-sealing machinery. Thus, high voltage transformers from everyday electronic appliances, such as CRT TVs and computer monitors, microwaves, automobile ignition… [read more]

Flyback driver #2: NE555 quasi-resonant

This single transistor flyback driver topology was created in response to achieve higher efficiency and higher output voltages from ordinary CRT television flybacks (diode split flybacks), for experiments such as x-rays or ionic lifters, without having to make any external HV multipliers. Since these flybacks are normally sealed in epoxy and can withstand an output voltage … [read more]

Flyback driver #1: Single transistor driver

Back in 2008 before starting with high voltage, I have made numerous experiments with flyback transformers and with simple single-transistor drivers, most of these were undocumented. However, this was one of my very first high voltage circuits and my first -electronic- circuits in general, which were marked with some success. The resulting simplicity of this circuit pardons … [read more]

380 volt circuit continuity tester

There’s always a need for a multimeter when working with electronic circuits. Especially when it comes to semiconductors. Using the internal diode test, which is now a part of every good meter, we are able to double-check the proper function of every diode, bipolar transistor and the like, before using them in our projects. However, there are still certain parts, for which … [read more]